Is the Irish Catholic Church Starting to Listen? New Post on Slugger O’Toole

image I’ve written a new post on the Slugger O’Toole blog, titled: ‘Is the Irish Catholic Church Starting to Listen?’

(Image: Bishop Noel Treanor at the Commissioning Service for the lay facilitator of the Diocese of Down and Connor’s ‘Listening Process’, from http://www.downandconnor.org/2011/02/07/listening-diocese/)

One Response to Is the Irish Catholic Church Starting to Listen? New Post on Slugger O’Toole

  1. martin February 13, 2011 at 6:02 pm #

    I think this is a good initiative. With a listening exercise, however, there is a requirement for solid discernment of what is heard. There has to be a sound judgement and discernment of what is heard – a separation of the weeds from the wheat of opinions, thoughts, feelings, and suggestions. The criteria, according to the Catholic Church, is to be found in the Sacred Scripture, Sacred Tradition, and the Magisterium. I am sure that much of what is offered will be good and fruitful, but amidst the good there will be a lot of rotten fruits in terms of those who seek to subvert the Catholic Church for their own ends.

    I would welcome such an exercise in my diocese, but I am not at all, I repeat, not at all confident that our Church leaders, from the bishop to the vast majority of the priests, have neither the competence nor the spiritual maturity to benefit from an exercise such as this. My fear is that it would just end up as an exercise of the blind leaders, listening to the dumb laity, and then acting in their blindness. Harsh, yes, but such is the woeful state of the Catholic Church in Ireland.

    In talking about dumb laity, I merely seek to state facts rather than insult: the laity are, by and large, woefully ill-formed in the faith and are easy prey to passing fads and acts of apostasy in order to be ‘trendy’. They’ve received hardly any catechesis and most are not evangelised, all the while they have imbibed the Kool-Aid of the modern, secular, hedonistic society, of which they are part. Their bishops and priests are often little better off, if not worse off, given their state in life, when they ought to know the faith they’ve been entrusted with and live it dynamically.

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